The Old Church, originally known as Calvary Presbyterian Church, is a Carpenter Gothic church located in downtown Portland, Oregon, United States, that is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Built in 1882, it was designed by Portland architect Warren Heywood Williams. The interior includes stained glass windows made by Portland's Povey Brothers Studio.The building's use as the Calvary Presbyterian Church ceased in 1948, when it was sold to the Evangel Baptist Church. Another Baptist congregation, First Southern Baptist (later becoming Metropolitan Baptist) purchased the building in 1951. It became unused in 1965 and was put up for sale, but remained unsold for an extended period, and its demolition was planned. In 1967, the non-profit group Old Church was formed with the intent of preserving the building. After a one-year fundraising campaign the group purchased the building from Metropolitan Baptist Church on April 1, 1969, for $95,000. At its next meeting, Old Church Inc. changed its name to the Old Church Society. Initial efforts to save and preserve the building were led by Lannie Hurst, an actress and performer. The Oregon Journal chose Hurst as one of 10 "Women of Accomplishment" in 1969, explaining that "Few fundraising campaigns of any sort ever captured the imagination and support of Portlanders as completely as did the drive to save The Old Church..." The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1972, under its original name of Calvary Presbyterian Church.Ref: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Old_Church_(Portland,_Oregon)
The Old Church, originally known as Calvary Presbyterian Church, is a Carpenter Gothic church located in downtown Portland, Oregon, United States, that is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Built in 1882, it was designed by Portland architect Warren Heywood Williams. The interior includes stained glass windows made by Portland's Povey Brothers Studio.The building's use as the Calvary Presbyterian Church ceased in 1948, when it was sold to the Evangel Baptist Church. Another Baptist congregation, First Southern Baptist (later becoming Metropolitan Baptist) purchased the building in 1951. It became unused in 1965 and was put up for sale, but remained unsold for an extended period, and its demolition was planned. In 1967, the non-profit group Old Church was formed with the intent of preserving the building. After a one-year fundraising campaign the group purchased the building from Metropolitan Baptist Church on April 1, 1969, for $95,000. At its next meeting, Old Church Inc. changed its name to the Old Church Society. Initial efforts to save and preserve the building were led by Lannie Hurst, an actress and performer. The Oregon Journal chose Hurst as one of 10 "Women of Accomplishment" in 1969, explaining that "Few fundraising campaigns of any sort ever captured the imagination and support of Portlanders as completely as did the drive to save The Old Church..." The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1972, under its original name of Calvary Presbyterian Church.Ref: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Old_Church_(Portland,_Oregon)
"Turns out the signs are put up by the Portland Fire Marshal to denote buildings that are unsafe for firefighters. The “U” stands for “unsafe.” They started going up about three years ago, said Mike Alderman, special hazards inspector with Portland Fire & Rescue.Here’s how they work: The fire department has a catalog of all the unsafe buildings that includes details on how the buildings are unsafe. For example, if a warehouse has a lot of cotton or paper products on the second story, firefighters need to know because those materials could absorb water and double the weight of the floor. The catalog also include details about where firefighters can and cannot go in the building, as well as details about which exits are blocked and which parts of the building are structurally unsound.This catalog is kept in a database that firefighters can access from computers in their trucks, but since they don’t usually have time to check it – fires are emergency situations, after all – they usually get the information from the dispatcher.So why do firefighters need signs if they have this database? The signs on the buildings are necessary, Alderman said, in cases where firefighters stumble upon a fire. For example, if firefighters get a call or just happen to see a fire without first talking to dispatch, the sign will let them know they need to ask dispatch about the special safety precautions before barging into the building.Now just because a building has a “U” sign doesn’t mean the building isn’t safe to inhabit. In fact, a building can be 100 percent up to building code but not comply with the fire code. Building owners may not like the “U” on their buildings, but Alderman said they usually understand it’s necessary. Besides, a building owner could always bring his building up to fire code, which would allow him to remove the sign." Ref: https://djcoregon.com/news/2010/10/01/what-do-the-red-u-signs-on-portland-buildings-mean/
"Turns out the signs are put up by the Portland Fire Marshal to denote buildings that are unsafe for firefighters. The “U” stands for “unsafe.” They started going up about three years ago, said Mike Alderman, special hazards inspector with Portland Fire & Rescue.Here’s how they work: The fire department has a catalog of all the unsafe buildings that includes details on how the buildings are unsafe. For example, if a warehouse has a lot of cotton or paper products on the second story, firefighters need to know because those materials could absorb water and double the weight of the floor. The catalog also include details about where firefighters can and cannot go in the building, as well as details about which exits are blocked and which parts of the building are structurally unsound.This catalog is kept in a database that firefighters can access from computers in their trucks, but since they don’t usually have time to check it – fires are emergency situations, after all – they usually get the information from the dispatcher.So why do firefighters need signs if they have this database? The signs on the buildings are necessary, Alderman said, in cases where firefighters stumble upon a fire. For example, if firefighters get a call or just happen to see a fire without first talking to dispatch, the sign will let them know they need to ask dispatch about the special safety precautions before barging into the building.Now just because a building has a “U” sign doesn’t mean the building isn’t safe to inhabit. In fact, a building can be 100 percent up to building code but not comply with the fire code. Building owners may not like the “U” on their buildings, but Alderman said they usually understand it’s necessary. Besides, a building owner could always bring his building up to fire code, which would allow him to remove the sign." Ref: https://djcoregon.com/news/2010/10/01/what-do-the-red-u-signs-on-portland-buildings-mean/
What Are Clinker Bricks?Named for the distinctive sound they make when banged together, clinker bricks are the result of wet bricks placed too close to the fire. The intense heat of coal-burning traditional kilns created a hard, durable brick that often twisted into volcanic shapes and textures. Overbaking produced rich, warm colors as well that ran the gamut from reds, yellows and oranges to deep, flash-burned browns, purples and blacks. No two clinker bricks were alike, rendering them trash to brick manufacturers who prized uniformity, but treasure to early modern architects, builders, and homeowners seeking uncommon architectural detail.“Clinker bricks were rejects because they were discolored or misshapen,” explains John Gavin of Gavin Historical Bricks, an Iowa City-based supplier of reclaimed antique paving and building materials. “The bricks were, however, still a solid building material, and in the early 20th century clinkers became popular when avant-garde architects started building houses with them precisely because they were so unusual.”During the Arts & Crafts era, clinkers were used to accentuate bungalow architecture, creating visual interest in focal points such as chimneys, porch supports and garden walls. The use of clinkers in English walls during the 19th century was well documented, but Charles and Henry Greene, who incorporated clinkers in their most famous California houses, may have been impressed after seeing the bricks used in buildings near Boston, where both brothers attended MIT.Modern clinkers like these aren’t accidents; they’re intentionally manufactured for their unique appearance, and their range of shapes can be used to lay walls creatively. (Photo: Courtesy of HistoricalBricks.com)Clinker use spread to other architectural styles, too, especially Colonial Revivals along the East coast, where entire homes, not just chimneys, were made of them. Kingston Heath, director of the historic preservation graduate program at the University of Oregon, thinks clinkers appealed to Colonial Revival designers because their irregularities hearkened back to pre-industrial times.  Ref: https://www.oldhouseonline.com/gardens-and-exteriors/guide-to-clinker-bricks/
What Are Clinker Bricks?Named for the distinctive sound they make when banged together, clinker bricks are the result of wet bricks placed too close to the fire. The intense heat of coal-burning traditional kilns created a hard, durable brick that often twisted into volcanic shapes and textures. Overbaking produced rich, warm colors as well that ran the gamut from reds, yellows and oranges to deep, flash-burned browns, purples and blacks. No two clinker bricks were alike, rendering them trash to brick manufacturers who prized uniformity, but treasure to early modern architects, builders, and homeowners seeking uncommon architectural detail.“Clinker bricks were rejects because they were discolored or misshapen,” explains John Gavin of Gavin Historical Bricks, an Iowa City-based supplier of reclaimed antique paving and building materials. “The bricks were, however, still a solid building material, and in the early 20th century clinkers became popular when avant-garde architects started building houses with them precisely because they were so unusual.”During the Arts & Crafts era, clinkers were used to accentuate bungalow architecture, creating visual interest in focal points such as chimneys, porch supports and garden walls. The use of clinkers in English walls during the 19th century was well documented, but Charles and Henry Greene, who incorporated clinkers in their most famous California houses, may have been impressed after seeing the bricks used in buildings near Boston, where both brothers attended MIT.Modern clinkers like these aren’t accidents; they’re intentionally manufactured for their unique appearance, and their range of shapes can be used to lay walls creatively. (Photo: Courtesy of HistoricalBricks.com)Clinker use spread to other architectural styles, too, especially Colonial Revivals along the East coast, where entire homes, not just chimneys, were made of them. Kingston Heath, director of the historic preservation graduate program at the University of Oregon, thinks clinkers appealed to Colonial Revival designers because their irregularities hearkened back to pre-industrial times. Ref: https://www.oldhouseonline.com/gardens-and-exteriors/guide-to-clinker-bricks/
I'm not sure what the name is for this type of sculpture.
I'm not sure what the name is for this type of sculpture.
"Countless individuals have shaped the history of winter sports in Oregon, including Native people who developed and adapted technology and cultural practices to survive and thrive with the snow and ice of winter months. Euro-American emigrants who arrived in the nineteenth century began to explore ways to recreate in the mountains, lakes, and rivers. In the beginning of the twentieth century, Oregonians started building alpine resorts, sporting clubs, and recreational facilities across the state.This work set the stage for championship athletes to thrive. Freeze the Day profiles 13 such athletes, including Olympic snowboarders Ben Ferguson and Chris Klug, luger Jack Elder, figure skater Tonya Harding, and Special Olympics Oregon snowboarder Henry Meece. Innovators also flourished, such as Hjalmar Hvam, who developed the world’s first workable safety ski binding, and Oregon Adaptive Sports, which provides snow opportunities to community members with disabilities. Visitors will also discover many of the ice sports that people enjoy throughout the state as well as beloved teams past and present, from the Portland Rosebuds to the Portland Winterhawks.Freeze the Day! is a fun and immersive exhibition for visitors of all ages. While snow may not be falling in the gallery, visitors can hold out their hand to “catch a snowflake” within the exhibit, look for friends and family in a community scrapbook, and share their love of Oregon’s wintry weather online using the hashtag #OHSFreezeTheDay. Freeze the Day! shares how winter sports continue to shape Oregon’s cultural fabric and offers something to all visitors, whether they are avid winter sports participants or simply admirers of Oregon’s natural wonders."Ref: https://www.ohs.org/museum/exhibits/freeze-the-day.cfm
"Countless individuals have shaped the history of winter sports in Oregon, including Native people who developed and adapted technology and cultural practices to survive and thrive with the snow and ice of winter months. Euro-American emigrants who arrived in the nineteenth century began to explore ways to recreate in the mountains, lakes, and rivers. In the beginning of the twentieth century, Oregonians started building alpine resorts, sporting clubs, and recreational facilities across the state.This work set the stage for championship athletes to thrive. Freeze the Day profiles 13 such athletes, including Olympic snowboarders Ben Ferguson and Chris Klug, luger Jack Elder, figure skater Tonya Harding, and Special Olympics Oregon snowboarder Henry Meece. Innovators also flourished, such as Hjalmar Hvam, who developed the world’s first workable safety ski binding, and Oregon Adaptive Sports, which provides snow opportunities to community members with disabilities. Visitors will also discover many of the ice sports that people enjoy throughout the state as well as beloved teams past and present, from the Portland Rosebuds to the Portland Winterhawks.Freeze the Day! is a fun and immersive exhibition for visitors of all ages. While snow may not be falling in the gallery, visitors can hold out their hand to “catch a snowflake” within the exhibit, look for friends and family in a community scrapbook, and share their love of Oregon’s wintry weather online using the hashtag #OHSFreezeTheDay. Freeze the Day! shares how winter sports continue to shape Oregon’s cultural fabric and offers something to all visitors, whether they are avid winter sports participants or simply admirers of Oregon’s natural wonders."Ref: https://www.ohs.org/museum/exhibits/freeze-the-day.cfm
"Countless individuals have shaped the history of winter sports in Oregon, including Native people who developed and adapted technology and cultural practices to survive and thrive with the snow and ice of winter months. Euro-American emigrants who arrived in the nineteenth century began to explore ways to recreate in the mountains, lakes, and rivers. In the beginning of the twentieth century, Oregonians started building alpine resorts, sporting clubs, and recreational facilities across the state.This work set the stage for championship athletes to thrive. Freeze the Day profiles 13 such athletes, including Olympic snowboarders Ben Ferguson and Chris Klug, luger Jack Elder, figure skater Tonya Harding, and Special Olympics Oregon snowboarder Henry Meece. Innovators also flourished, such as Hjalmar Hvam, who developed the world’s first workable safety ski binding, and Oregon Adaptive Sports, which provides snow opportunities to community members with disabilities. Visitors will also discover many of the ice sports that people enjoy throughout the state as well as beloved teams past and present, from the Portland Rosebuds to the Portland Winterhawks.Freeze the Day! is a fun and immersive exhibition for visitors of all ages. While snow may not be falling in the gallery, visitors can hold out their hand to “catch a snowflake” within the exhibit, look for friends and family in a community scrapbook, and share their love of Oregon’s wintry weather online using the hashtag #OHSFreezeTheDay. Freeze the Day! shares how winter sports continue to shape Oregon’s cultural fabric and offers something to all visitors, whether they are avid winter sports participants or simply admirers of Oregon’s natural wonders."Ref: https://www.ohs.org/museum/exhibits/freeze-the-day.cfm
"Countless individuals have shaped the history of winter sports in Oregon, including Native people who developed and adapted technology and cultural practices to survive and thrive with the snow and ice of winter months. Euro-American emigrants who arrived in the nineteenth century began to explore ways to recreate in the mountains, lakes, and rivers. In the beginning of the twentieth century, Oregonians started building alpine resorts, sporting clubs, and recreational facilities across the state.This work set the stage for championship athletes to thrive. Freeze the Day profiles 13 such athletes, including Olympic snowboarders Ben Ferguson and Chris Klug, luger Jack Elder, figure skater Tonya Harding, and Special Olympics Oregon snowboarder Henry Meece. Innovators also flourished, such as Hjalmar Hvam, who developed the world’s first workable safety ski binding, and Oregon Adaptive Sports, which provides snow opportunities to community members with disabilities. Visitors will also discover many of the ice sports that people enjoy throughout the state as well as beloved teams past and present, from the Portland Rosebuds to the Portland Winterhawks.Freeze the Day! is a fun and immersive exhibition for visitors of all ages. While snow may not be falling in the gallery, visitors can hold out their hand to “catch a snowflake” within the exhibit, look for friends and family in a community scrapbook, and share their love of Oregon’s wintry weather online using the hashtag #OHSFreezeTheDay. Freeze the Day! shares how winter sports continue to shape Oregon’s cultural fabric and offers something to all visitors, whether they are avid winter sports participants or simply admirers of Oregon’s natural wonders."Ref: https://www.ohs.org/museum/exhibits/freeze-the-day.cfm
On a nearly daily basis, tourists and locals stand on the Oregon Historical Society (OHS) plaza, gazing up at the historic Sovereign Hotel while considering the vast, painted façade that faces west toward the South Park Blocks. The trompe l’oeil (pronounced “tromp la” or “tromp loi”) mural, created by artist Richard Haas, depicts thirty-foot-high likenesses of Lewis and Clark Expedition members. Painted on the westward facing wall are: Meriwether Lewis and William Clark; Sacagawea and her infant child, Baptiste; Clark’s personal slave, York; and Lewis’s Newfoundland, Seaman. While the scale in itself is enough to stop you in your tracks, the clever technique used to paint the mural leads many to ask our Visitor Services staff — “is that painting really flat?”Born in Spring Green, Wisconsin, in 1936, Haas attributes his career as an artist to early experiences at Taliesin, architect Frank Lloyd Wright’s home, studio, and school. There, he interacted with students in the studio while working as an assistant stonemason. Haas first employed the trompe l’oiel (or trick of the eye) in 1974, replicating the front elevation of a cast-iron building in Manhattan. The Washington Post described Haas’s use of the technique — once popular among ancient Greek and Roman muralists and during the European Renaissance — as “a curious border zone between architecture and art, building and decoration.” Arguably, Haas is the most notable twentieth century painter in this style, with murals adorning buildings across the United States and in Europe.What OHS staff often refer to as the “Haas Murals” grace the western and southern facing exterior walls of the historic Sovereign Hotel, built in 1923 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places. OHS purchased the Sovereign in 1982, nearly twenty years after moving to its current location on SW Park Avenue between SW Madison and Jefferson streets. In 1989, then executive director Thomas Vaughan commissioned the murals that continue to captivate passersby.Designing murals of this scale was no small feat. Haas and his assistants rendered scale drawings of the murals in their studio on three-dimensional models called maquettes. The 14,000 square foot painting took three months to paint. Portland artists Cynthia Martin, Pattison Skoshe, Steve Baratta, Anne Elizabeth Kelley, along with Larry Zink of New Orleans and Harley Bartlett of Rhode Island, executed the murals. They transferred Haas’s scale drawings (drawn at 1/24 of the mural’s size) to the massive walls using a silica-based paint that is resistant to weather. Not only did they paint the historic scenes, they also created the brick and stonework images, which look so authentic they are sometimes confused for the real masonry.In 2014, OHS sold the Sovereign Hotel building but retained ownership of the mural. The sale agreement stipulated that restoration would take place following needed building repairs, and the new owners, 1922 Sovereign LLC, in partnership with OHS and Jessica Engeman, Historic Preservation Specialist from Venerable Group, Inc., selected classically trained painter, sculptor, and muralist Dan Cohen to handle the mural restoration.After adorning the Sovereign for nearly three decades, painters whitewashed the Sovereign’s façade in 2016. Cohen and his team completely repainted the murals that summer, revealing an uncanny replica of the original. Cohen consulted closely with Haas throughout the restoration process, and both artists signed the “new” mural, officially re-dedicated at the OHS Annual Meeting of the Membership on May 20, 2017.So, yes, the mural is indeed flat, but its story is far from two-dimensional. OHS is proud of this unique piece of public art and looks forward to seeing the surprise, wonder, and admiration it evokes for years to come.Ref: https://www.ohs.org/blog/is-it-flat.cfm
On a nearly daily basis, tourists and locals stand on the Oregon Historical Society (OHS) plaza, gazing up at the historic Sovereign Hotel while considering the vast, painted façade that faces west toward the South Park Blocks. The trompe l’oeil (pronounced “tromp la” or “tromp loi”) mural, created by artist Richard Haas, depicts thirty-foot-high likenesses of Lewis and Clark Expedition members. Painted on the westward facing wall are: Meriwether Lewis and William Clark; Sacagawea and her infant child, Baptiste; Clark’s personal slave, York; and Lewis’s Newfoundland, Seaman. While the scale in itself is enough to stop you in your tracks, the clever technique used to paint the mural leads many to ask our Visitor Services staff — “is that painting really flat?”Born in Spring Green, Wisconsin, in 1936, Haas attributes his career as an artist to early experiences at Taliesin, architect Frank Lloyd Wright’s home, studio, and school. There, he interacted with students in the studio while working as an assistant stonemason. Haas first employed the trompe l’oiel (or trick of the eye) in 1974, replicating the front elevation of a cast-iron building in Manhattan. The Washington Post described Haas’s use of the technique — once popular among ancient Greek and Roman muralists and during the European Renaissance — as “a curious border zone between architecture and art, building and decoration.” Arguably, Haas is the most notable twentieth century painter in this style, with murals adorning buildings across the United States and in Europe.What OHS staff often refer to as the “Haas Murals” grace the western and southern facing exterior walls of the historic Sovereign Hotel, built in 1923 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places. OHS purchased the Sovereign in 1982, nearly twenty years after moving to its current location on SW Park Avenue between SW Madison and Jefferson streets. In 1989, then executive director Thomas Vaughan commissioned the murals that continue to captivate passersby.Designing murals of this scale was no small feat. Haas and his assistants rendered scale drawings of the murals in their studio on three-dimensional models called maquettes. The 14,000 square foot painting took three months to paint. Portland artists Cynthia Martin, Pattison Skoshe, Steve Baratta, Anne Elizabeth Kelley, along with Larry Zink of New Orleans and Harley Bartlett of Rhode Island, executed the murals. They transferred Haas’s scale drawings (drawn at 1/24 of the mural’s size) to the massive walls using a silica-based paint that is resistant to weather. Not only did they paint the historic scenes, they also created the brick and stonework images, which look so authentic they are sometimes confused for the real masonry.In 2014, OHS sold the Sovereign Hotel building but retained ownership of the mural. The sale agreement stipulated that restoration would take place following needed building repairs, and the new owners, 1922 Sovereign LLC, in partnership with OHS and Jessica Engeman, Historic Preservation Specialist from Venerable Group, Inc., selected classically trained painter, sculptor, and muralist Dan Cohen to handle the mural restoration.After adorning the Sovereign for nearly three decades, painters whitewashed the Sovereign’s façade in 2016. Cohen and his team completely repainted the murals that summer, revealing an uncanny replica of the original. Cohen consulted closely with Haas throughout the restoration process, and both artists signed the “new” mural, officially re-dedicated at the OHS Annual Meeting of the Membership on May 20, 2017.So, yes, the mural is indeed flat, but its story is far from two-dimensional. OHS is proud of this unique piece of public art and looks forward to seeing the surprise, wonder, and admiration it evokes for years to come.Ref: https://www.ohs.org/blog/is-it-flat.cfm
Hilton Portland Downtown.Ref: https://www.hilton.com/en/hotels/pdxphhh-hilton-portland-downtown/gallery/
Hilton Portland Downtown.Ref: https://www.hilton.com/en/hotels/pdxphhh-hilton-portland-downtown/gallery/
Pioneer Courthouse Square, in partnership with the City of Portland Recovery & Events Action Table, is excited to host The Welcome Dome. This new temporary community event space at the Square offers a seasonal space for the community to host events, workshops, art installations, performances and more!The Welcome Dome will partner with community organizations, artists, performers, and creators to program the space with dynamic programming April 6 – June 10, 2022. The Dome is free to use for public events and comes with support from the Square’s team, as well as basic infrastructure (lighting, sound, climate control, flooring, stage).Ref: https://www.thesquarepdx.org/dome/
Pioneer Courthouse Square, in partnership with the City of Portland Recovery & Events Action Table, is excited to host The Welcome Dome. This new temporary community event space at the Square offers a seasonal space for the community to host events, workshops, art installations, performances and more!The Welcome Dome will partner with community organizations, artists, performers, and creators to program the space with dynamic programming April 6 – June 10, 2022. The Dome is free to use for public events and comes with support from the Square’s team, as well as basic infrastructure (lighting, sound, climate control, flooring, stage).Ref: https://www.thesquarepdx.org/dome/
Pioneer Courthouse Square, in partnership with the City of Portland Recovery & Events Action Table, is excited to host The Welcome Dome. This new temporary community event space at the Square offers a seasonal space for the community to host events, workshops, art installations, performances and more!The Welcome Dome will partner with community organizations, artists, performers, and creators to program the space with dynamic programming April 6 – June 10, 2022. The Dome is free to use for public events and comes with support from the Square’s team, as well as basic infrastructure (lighting, sound, climate control, flooring, stage).Ref: https://www.thesquarepdx.org/dome/
Pioneer Courthouse Square, in partnership with the City of Portland Recovery & Events Action Table, is excited to host The Welcome Dome. This new temporary community event space at the Square offers a seasonal space for the community to host events, workshops, art installations, performances and more!The Welcome Dome will partner with community organizations, artists, performers, and creators to program the space with dynamic programming April 6 – June 10, 2022. The Dome is free to use for public events and comes with support from the Square’s team, as well as basic infrastructure (lighting, sound, climate control, flooring, stage).Ref: https://www.thesquarepdx.org/dome/
Pioneer Courthouse Square, in partnership with the City of Portland Recovery & Events Action Table, is excited to host The Welcome Dome. This new temporary community event space at the Square offers a seasonal space for the community to host events, workshops, art installations, performances and more!The Welcome Dome will partner with community organizations, artists, performers, and creators to program the space with dynamic programming April 6 – June 10, 2022. The Dome is free to use for public events and comes with support from the Square’s team, as well as basic infrastructure (lighting, sound, climate control, flooring, stage).Ref: https://www.thesquarepdx.org/dome/
Pioneer Courthouse Square, in partnership with the City of Portland Recovery & Events Action Table, is excited to host The Welcome Dome. This new temporary community event space at the Square offers a seasonal space for the community to host events, workshops, art installations, performances and more!The Welcome Dome will partner with community organizations, artists, performers, and creators to program the space with dynamic programming April 6 – June 10, 2022. The Dome is free to use for public events and comes with support from the Square’s team, as well as basic infrastructure (lighting, sound, climate control, flooring, stage).Ref: https://www.thesquarepdx.org/dome/
Pioneer Courthouse Square, in partnership with the City of Portland Recovery & Events Action Table, is excited to host The Welcome Dome. This new temporary community event space at the Square offers a seasonal space for the community to host events, workshops, art installations, performances and more!The Welcome Dome will partner with community organizations, artists, performers, and creators to program the space with dynamic programming April 6 – June 10, 2022. The Dome is free to use for public events and comes with support from the Square’s team, as well as basic infrastructure (lighting, sound, climate control, flooring, stage).Ref: https://www.thesquarepdx.org/dome/
Pioneer Courthouse Square, in partnership with the City of Portland Recovery & Events Action Table, is excited to host The Welcome Dome. This new temporary community event space at the Square offers a seasonal space for the community to host events, workshops, art installations, performances and more!The Welcome Dome will partner with community organizations, artists, performers, and creators to program the space with dynamic programming April 6 – June 10, 2022. The Dome is free to use for public events and comes with support from the Square’s team, as well as basic infrastructure (lighting, sound, climate control, flooring, stage).Ref: https://www.thesquarepdx.org/dome/
PORTLAND, Ore. — There's more space for pedestrians and cyclists in downtown Portland thanks to the completion of the "Better Naito" project. The latest extension is called "Better Naito Forever" and stretches over a mile from Harrison to Northwest Davis Streets.The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) said that the project will allow cyclists and pedestrians to get around without coming in close contact with cars. "It took one lane of traffic northbound and created a bike facility, and also included a mile of sidewalk that enabled people to walk along Waterfront Park safely," said Chris Warner with PBOT.Portland city officials hope improvements to pedestrian areas bring more visitors downtown. Issues with crime and protests have kept people away."When people are on the street, when people are active and people are riding and out having a good time, everybody is safer," Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty said. "We have people who need mental healthcare and treatment and we don't have that, we don't have enough beds for them, but every major city has that."At the ribbon cutting on Friday, both cyclists and pedestrians were welcoming the upgrade. Cassie Wilson comes downtown for events a couple times a month."If you have somewhere to be, it's nice to be able to go directly to where you need to go — and having the physical separation from the cars makes a huge difference," Wilson said.The cost of the project was $4 million which covered the sidewalks, curbs and traffic signals. There were also new bike signals added, in addition to 17,000 square-feet of sidewalk.Ref: https://www.kgw.com/video/news/local/better-naito-forever-project-finishes-with-a-flourish/283-0168e21d-2530-43ef-9e96-c2608d564411
PORTLAND, Ore. — There's more space for pedestrians and cyclists in downtown Portland thanks to the completion of the "Better Naito" project. The latest extension is called "Better Naito Forever" and stretches over a mile from Harrison to Northwest Davis Streets.The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) said that the project will allow cyclists and pedestrians to get around without coming in close contact with cars. "It took one lane of traffic northbound and created a bike facility, and also included a mile of sidewalk that enabled people to walk along Waterfront Park safely," said Chris Warner with PBOT.Portland city officials hope improvements to pedestrian areas bring more visitors downtown. Issues with crime and protests have kept people away."When people are on the street, when people are active and people are riding and out having a good time, everybody is safer," Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty said. "We have people who need mental healthcare and treatment and we don't have that, we don't have enough beds for them, but every major city has that."At the ribbon cutting on Friday, both cyclists and pedestrians were welcoming the upgrade. Cassie Wilson comes downtown for events a couple times a month."If you have somewhere to be, it's nice to be able to go directly to where you need to go — and having the physical separation from the cars makes a huge difference," Wilson said.The cost of the project was $4 million which covered the sidewalks, curbs and traffic signals. There were also new bike signals added, in addition to 17,000 square-feet of sidewalk.Ref: https://www.kgw.com/video/news/local/better-naito-forever-project-finishes-with-a-flourish/283-0168e21d-2530-43ef-9e96-c2608d564411
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